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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
that made it. >> i would like you to meet michael johnson. he has been in the program for over 8 years. >> nice to me you. what inspired your photography? >> i am inspired everything that i see. the greatest thing about being a photographer is being able to show other people what i see. i have mostly worked in cuba and work that i shot here in san francisco. >> what is it about being a street artist that you particularly like? >> i liked it to the first day that i did it. i like talking to mentum people. talking about art or anything that comes to our minds. there is more visibility than i would see in any store front. this would cost us relatively very little. >> i am so happy to mt
consequences for it. >> he has been compared to lyndon johnson i think lyndon johnson used profanity strategically and as a bully tactic. when you're in a position of rahm emmanuel and you swear at somebody you can swear at them but they can't swear at you. just the fact that you're using profanity. one of the cases where this came up, this was in jonathan aldridge's book "the promise" take your f-ing tampons out and tell me what you have to have to say. that came up when a former senator wanted to make his temperament an issue. she said, no tampons. let's talk about tampons. this is not about tampons but how women would feel about someone who does that in the workplace. so i would say that it lowered the tone of the mayoral debates. >> after--sorry, after that the mayor grabbed me by the arm. his bodyguards came in. the question is has it been an affective management strategy in chicago? can you talk about the union strike, how did it go? how did it go when the mayor behaved this way? >> i would say no, because one of the most famous stories he was meeting with karen lewis president
congressman dan johnson. good to have you with me this saturday. >> thank you for having me. >> the republican plan is coupled with a no budget, no-pay provision aimed at forcing the senate to pass the budget before an april deadline. if no budget is passed, members of congress, including yourself, don't get paid. what do you think about that proposal? >> well, you know, we have an issue with republicans who can't even control the members in their own caucus thinking that they can control proceedings in the senate and also the president enforced those to do what they want to have done and so they are trying to postpone the day of reckoning basically, for two months and i don't think the scheme is going work. >> so you don't support any part of that proposal? >> well, i mean, if we have a clean debt ceiling bill that comes forward and it's only for three months, that's something that i certainly would consider, but to tie a rise in the debt ceiling to decreasing spending on programs that benefit the middle class, i think it's the republicans' ultimate objective and i certainly do not support th
, 1969, richard nixon, john f. kennedy in 1961. george h.w. bush in 1989, lyndon johnson from 1965, president jimmy carter in 1977, and we will wrap up the night at 11:00 eastern with president george w. bush speech from 19 -- from 2001. >> i barack hussein obama do solemnly swear that i will execute the office of president of the an ad states faithfully -- >> when chief justice john roberts administered the oath to barack obama on january 20, 2009, there was a major problem. roberts was supposed to say "that i will faithfully execute the office of president of united states. then barack obama stops, paused, smiled, as if to say, "c'mon, man, this is my big day, you got to get this right." unfortunately, he did not get it right, so the very next night in the white house, they did it again. this time roberts used notes which he had not used the first time, and they got it right. >> the history of democracy's big day, monday at 8:00 a.m. part of a three-day holiday "book tv."c-span's >> the house in for a brief protest for a session this afternoon. party leaders have been sounding ou
-line second amendment position and president obama's position. if you were johnson or bill clinton you would have private meetings or ask your chief staff or others to have private meetings with republican members and say, what can we do? what can we agree on? no. they have this task force that is entirely testimony of all the people on his side, the n.r.a. comes in for 20 minutes and he announced the gun control, he does 23 executive orders and has a list of legislation. there is not much evidence that he wants to or knows how to try to co-op the republicans. >>bret: the moody -- bloody end to the algerian hostage stand off. >>bret: the smoke is clearing in algeria as the national gas plant. they captureed five surviving militants but the death toll is rising. 23 hostages have been killed and reuters say the number is 48. the total number of militants and hostages could be 81 with a number western governments upset how this went down. we are back with our annal. the administration said today, a.b. saying we will lead where they can lead but in this situation the algerians took the lead and
. we'll look at earnings from general electric, morgan stanley, schlumberger, johnson controls, state street and suntrust bank. >>> the outgoing treasury secretary, whose last day on the job is january 25th, tells "the wall street journal" the u.s. is well ahead of other countries in balancing the financial system. geithner says the u.s. has more diversity of strength from energy to high tech and the public should find comfort and optimism in that. but, rob, the public is not finding much optimism, are they? >> they shouldn't, given that we didn't get the fiscal cliff deal that we thought we did on january 1st. we got a mini deal. it looks like rubbish. they shouldn't be desperately optimistic. other things are going right. stock prices have been reasonably buoyant. the gas prices are going to pick up again. consumer sentiment, i wouldn't be getting too carried away. >> do you agree with his characterization that this is the last quarter of recovery from the crisis? and it comes when mohamed el-erian is out there saying maybe we've reached the old normal and we're going back to the ne
that johnson was asking for all those big things together really helped. >> the end of the iraq war was not marked as a massive occasion in this country when it happened. there was some primetime news programs that didn't cover it the day that it happened, the day that was the end of the war. but people, when you ask them broadly in the country, end up ranking ending the war as president obama's greatest single accomplishment in his first four years. what explains the primacy of that in memory, even as it was buried in the news as we went through it? >> well, go back to the democratic primaries of 2008. what was the biggest issue? barack obama probably became the nominee largely because he was against the war at the beginning. hillary clinton was for it. so people obviously noticed the absence of that. but even more than that, i'm sure you're wiser than i was. but four years ago i could not imagine that anyone who was president could not only have gotten us completely out of this war, but also do so without that government in iraq collapsing, and more so, without an angry domestic b
debate. >> steve: so will this set the tone for the next four years? peter johnson, jr., 24 hours ago issues we were sit nearing the studio and you were hopeful that the president of the united states would extend the hand -- >> i believe that he would. in fact, a couple people e-mailed me. one woman said i was delusional in that prospect. so what we heard was a hard left manifesto from the president of the united states yesterday at the inauguration. it was not so much about populism as it was about pandering. taas bizarre, disregarded priority of what our national interests were. where was the debt? where was the deficit in where was the unemployment? where was the issue of poverty in america, which has increased under his watch? where is the hopelessness? where is the fear that so many americans have that they're going to lose their house? where are the solutions for those problems? instead, we got this catalog of false premises, phantom arguments in terms of civil rights, in terms of global warming, in terms of long lines at the polls. so if i'm voting for the president in this p
from new hampshire, johnson and washington bureau chief susan page and congressman from maryland and former naacp president. welcome all of you. >> thank you. >> i want to start with guns. congressman. do you think -- were you surprised that the president went as big as he did? of course i really wasn't. the president got elected after a long, tough struggle to put forth a vision. i think this is the first part of the vision. i don't think it was planned. i think what happened in the tragedy here kind of spurred him in that direction. and you know, this use of executive order as we have seen since 1933 when fdr first went to the congress and asked for those powers. so they have been around. this is a bold effort. and i think he did so many executive orders, simply to try to increase some of the pressure on the congress and on others. >> in 1994, you had a hard time getting this done and you had democratic congress. john, you're from a state, live free or die. even if you're a democrat or republican, you're unified when it comes to all things guns. is there any part of this you th
that polarization? >> you know what, lyndon johnson opened up the war on immigration in appalachia. most poor people are white, female and young, and black and brown hunger hurts. 50 million, these people are malnourished, homeless or wandering. they're unbankable, therefore they're driven into expensive loan arrangements. they are poor. they cannot send their children to school. they cannot dream. 50 million more very close to them, this impact of growing poverty and racial polarization and violence is a hell of a combination, and i would think that now we must in substance take a hard look at poverty. and some plan for economic reconstruction. look at places like inglewood, the president organized, london or austin, 45% unemployment. 50% unemployment. must be some targeted jobs planning and, of course, it's cheaper to educate than incarcerate. >> i remember most poignant memories about election night was a picture of you with tears streaming down your cheeks there in grand park, and i'm wondering if you have the same sort of combination of joy and hope that that expressed to me about the next four
in these four years, j. johnson at the pentagon gave a speech saying we need to think about when we bring the war on terror to a close. when is it over? >> it's never over. >> that is the problem. we had a person on the program who is the only one to vote against the use of military force. it's the document from which all authority flows. she is proposing we repeal that operation. we are out of afghanistan. osama bin laden is dead. al qaeda is the al qaeda that attacked us has been destroyed. >> if you do it and there's an attack on american soil then you are the president who ended the war on terror. this is a president of any ideology, of any party. >> 1,000% the problem. >> yeah. >> you are taking on tremendous political risk. the reason they endure is because part of the calculation is that. if you are the one -- this is true about guantanamo. if they had closed guantanamo and took the right position to close it. it's not closed because of congressional opposition. if you close it and god forbid someone who is a guantanamo deta detainee, the political blowback would be insane. it's no
on the shoulders of people who have been in the white house. president lincoln, kennedy, johnson. the asa stands on the shoulders of the black people who experienced it in the white house. as you noted in your intro, this goes from thosroindividuals who worked to build the white house when washington, d.c., when the country first came into existence, washington dc did not exist. it literally had to be built and it took 10 years. much of that labour from clearing the land, moving the trees and rocks came from african americans and slave labor. the iconic buildings that we know, the capital, the white house, both were built not only by unskilled black labor, people who did just sort of the hard work, but still black labor like carpenters, or african- americans. the first african-american who had engaged in the president's residence whether it was the white house we know now in washington or in the residence of the president george washington when he first went to new york and then when he moved from new york to the president's residence in philadelphia, and both of those residences, washington too
-- lyndon johnson filed it once in his six years. i filed it 390 some odd times. so we've got to change that. if you invoke that on a piece of legislation, people get 30 hours to sit around and do nothing. i want to get rid of that. i think we should not have the 30-hours post. and i think that we have to make sure that on a regular piece of legislation, if somebody wants to continue objecting to it after it's been invoked they should have to stand and talk. there should be a talking filibuster. >> okay. so there's -- can you explain this 30-hour thing? i think that -- in the grand scheme of things is the most egregious which is, you know, filibustering the motion to proceed and then, there's this weird kind of period after you filibuster with motion to proceed where it's mandated no one can do anything? >> well, there are two familiar low periods. first is when eye file the 16 senators file a motion that moves towards kloture and that's two full working days and then you have the vote and if you achieve, you're cutting off debate, then there's a 30-hour period that follows after that. and t
johnson. that's true. >> anybody compared to bill clinton and lyndon johnson -- not going to change really in that sense. he is who he is. he doesn't want to appear to be inauthentic about it. one of the things about bill clinton was he was what i call an authentic phony. everybody believed what he was saying at the moment. barack obama always had more difficult time trying to act that up. but as he said the other day, you know, he is a nice enough guy. echoed what he said about hillary. nice enough, too. >> that line didn't go over so well the first time. >> he was talking about himself a little easier maybe. >> maybe. but do -- does he enjoy politics? >> yes. well, he enjoys politics but enjoys other things as well. you know, i -- i think that he -- he's learning how to really sort of merge that with the other aspects of what he enjoys which is policy and rest of life. >> can i say two words? joe biden. that's what joe biden is for. he does the things the president really dislikes doing. i mean, it is -- if the president doesn't like to glad hand and hang out with members of congress, th
massachusetts -- nathaniel gorham, rus king. from connecticut --, william samuel johnson, roger sherman. new york -- alexander hamilton . new jersey -- will livingston, david brearley, william paterson, jonathan dayton. pennsylvania -- benjamin franklin, thomas mifflin, robert morris, george clymer, thomas fitzsimons, jared ingersoll, james wilson, governor morris. mr. goodlatte: i yieldo the gentleman from ksas, mr. yoder. mr. yoder: amendment 1, congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof or abridging the freedom of speech or of the press or the right of the people peaceably to assemble and petition the government to redress of grievances. amendment 2, a well-regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed. amendment 3, no soldier shall in time of peace be quartered at any house without the consent of the owner nor in time of war but in a manner to be prescribed by law. mr. goodlatte: i yield to the gentleman from kentucky, mr. barr. mr. bar
of war is -- jay johnson, the general kuns counsel of the pentagon, gave a speech about thinking about ending that war. we think about iraq and afghanistan. the hot wars. boots on the grounds wars. the broader framework of war under which we labor through the amf i agree with you the odds are slim that we're going to see a repeal of that, an end to that, but i think it's a place for the conversation to go in the second term as the president headed towards withdrawal with afghanistan and the physical presence we have of u.s. soldiers. >> as we start to understand what an obama foreign policy is. i mean, you look back at the first inaugural just compared with the second inaugural address. the first inaugural address was about ending the era of bush and cheney. that's really what it was about. it was about we're going to do this in i different way. if you unclench your fist. it's a different time now. he has to figure out what he is going to do affirmatively, not in reaction to the way somebody else did it that he disapproved of. >> look at the change in personnel. to go from gates to hil
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)

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